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Alabama governor clears near-total abortion ban bill

18 May 2019

Updated: On Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union vowed to challenge Alabama's abortion ban that was signed into law the same day by Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey.

Missouri's Republican-led Legislature on Friday approved a sweeping bill to ban abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy, joining Alabama and other states that have moved to severely restrict the procedure. "Momentum is clearly on the side of life and it is only a matter of time until our nation's laws protect this foundational human right for all children, born and unborn". There is no exception for pregnancies resulting from rape and incest. Doctors would face five to 15 years in prison for violating the eight-week cutoff. If the right to abortion is at risk, that dynamic may change.

The State of Missouri has followed in the footsteps of Georgia and Alabama by passing an abortion bill of its own. Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia have approved bans on abortion once fetal cardiac activity can be detected, which can occur in about the sixth week of pregnancy.

In addition to having no exceptions for rape or incest, the bill also bans all abortions because of race, sex or a diagnosis of Down syndrome. In response, actress and talk show host, Busy Philipps started the #youknowme social media conversation to raise awareness about the experiences of people who have had abortions.

Women from across the country have been jumping on the hashtag to share their experiences with abortion, here are 20 of their stories.

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"This communicates a message to people that they can not have bodily autonomy at a time in their lives where re-establishing control over their bodies is vital to healing the trauma of sexual violence". The girl had become pregnant after her grandmother's 65-year-old partner raped her.

The bill, which was filed in January, has not yet been scheduled for a hearing, although sponsors indicate there could be hearings in the fall. However, this law will only stand as law should Roe v. Wade be overturned.

Brian Kemp signed a bill banning abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, before a woman usually knows she's even pregnant. Due to strict abortion laws, many Irish women are forced to abort overseas. But the current Supreme Court is more likely to take an incremental approach that approves abortion restrictions without overturning the right to abortion, report the New York Times, USA Today and the Washington Post.

Many said that while they consider themselves pro-life, this law goes too far. The Supreme Court will take up one of these cases if four members of the court are so inclined.

How unsafe is this bill?

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In its Roe v. Wade decision, the Supreme Court noted that viability typically was 24 to 28 weeks.

The bill (and others like it) is unsafe in several ways.

Protests have seen things like airplanes flying a banner that reads, "Abortion is OK" which was paid for by Georgia organization Amplify.

Most anti-abortion bills have faced legal challenges.

Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kirsten Gillibrand of NY also have endorsed the codification of abortion rights, while Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, said Thursday that such a move "deserves to be taken seriously". As was the case before the legalization of abortion in the US, there was an underground market for abortions that was often extremely expensive and unsafe. Working-class and low-income communities in Alabama will be hit hardest by this bill. It is also worth considering that Alabama is among the poorest places in the US and has some of the poorest sub-regions in the industrialized world.

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Alabama governor clears near-total abortion ban bill