Monday, 21 January 2019
Latest news
Main » Vitamin D not effective at reducing falls or fracture risk 0 Comments

Vitamin D not effective at reducing falls or fracture risk 0 Comments

08 October 2018

At present, the Department of Health in the United Kingdom urges people to take vitamin D supplements regularly, especially during the winter months between October and March when UV exposure is low.

"Since the last major review of the evidence in 2014, more than 30 randomised controlled trials on vitamin D and bone health have been published, almost doubling the evidence base available".

Lead author Dr Mark Bolland, of the University of Auckland, New Zealand, said: "Since the last major review of evidence in 2014, more than 30 randomised controlled trials on vitamin D and bone health have been published, almost doubling the evidence base available".

The study, carried out by researchers from the Universities of Auckland and Aberdeen, was a meta-analysis of 81 clinical trials, including over 53,000 patients, looking at the effects of vitamin D on fracture rates, falls and bone mineral density.

The researchers are calling for changes in the clinical guidelines of osteoporosis management. Not everyone is convinced by the overall finding that vitamin D supplementation is worthless, CNN notes.

More news: Eleague hosting charity event for Call of Duty: Black Ops 4

Overall, the study highlights the importance of maintaining optimal levels of vitamin D from natural sources such as sunlight and diet.

According to Bolland and his team, it is time that we stop advocating vitamin D supplementation for osteoporosis; a bone condition where the bones become weak and brittle and tend to fracture easily.

Vitamin D helps regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body, which are needed to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy.

Moreover, new research covered studies that included women aged 65 and older who took vitamin D supplements on daily basis.

Bolland suggests doctors and health officials now recommending the vitamin to older patients as a way to prevent osteoporosis or brittle bones should stop. These can occur due to vitamin D deficiency.

More news: 'A profoundly heart-breaking day': Celebration and anger for Brett Kavanaugh confirmation

The analysis found that vitamin D supplementation did not reduce total fractures, hip fractures or falls by the 15% defined as a clinically meaningful threshold.

In a previous report, Dr. Clifford Rosen, professor of medicine at the Tufts University School of Medicine and senior scientist at Maine Medical Center, told CNN that it's generally better to get vitamin D from the sun and food than from supplements.

The majority of the trials that were analysed looked at vitamin D alone (not prescribed in conjunction with calcium supplements) and were of one year or less.

The study was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand.

More news: United States oil exports fall as India turns to Iran ahead of sanctions

Vitamin D not effective at reducing falls or fracture risk 0 Comments