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Paleontologists Find Extraordinary Set of Mega-Shark Teeth in Australia | Paleontology

12 August 2018

Turns out he found out a rare set of teeth of a giant ancient mega-shark which weighted twice the size of the great white.

Most of the teeth belonged to Carcharocles angustidens, but in addition, they found something even more surprising - several teeth of a smaller shark, the sixgill shark (genus Hexanchus).

Phillip Mullaly, an Australian fossil enthusiast and teacher, made the discovery of his life on a beach in Australia.

Upon examination, the teeth were found to have belonged to a type of shark called the "great jagged narrow-toothed shark", or Carcharocles angustidens, Fox News reported.

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"These teeth are of global significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set to ever be discovered in Australia", he said.

"It dawned on me when I found the second, third and fourth tooth that this was a really big deal", Mullaly said.

The citizen scientist ended up pulling a 2.7-inch-long (7 centimeters) out of the boulder and took it to Museums Victoria for authentication.

Mullaly's is one of the rarest finds in the history of paleontology, according to Erich Fitzgerald, a palaeontologist at Museums Victoria who led a team to excavate the site where the initial fossils were found. Image credit: Museums Victoria.

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Paleontologist-a lover Philip Mullaly came across a unique artifact when walking through the countryside, Jan-JUC, located about 100 kilometers from Melbourne. That cartilage does not easily decompose, which is why individual shark tooth fossils are somewhat common. Fitzgerald's team also came across the teeth of a sixgill shark-a creature that swims around Australia to this day-and concluded that a school of sixgills had fed on the massive Carcharocles angustidens on the sea floor.

"The stench of blood and decaying flesh would have drawn scavengers from far around", he said.

"Sixgill sharks still exist off the Victorian coast today, where they live off the remains of whales and other animals", says Tim Ziegler, a paleontologist at Museums Victoria. "This find suggests they have performed that lifestyle here for tens of millions of years".

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Paleontologists Find Extraordinary Set of Mega-Shark Teeth in Australia | Paleontology