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Johns Hopkins evacuated after staff accidentally drops deadly tuberculosis sample

07 July 2018

Crowds of medical staff streamed out of the hospital on Thursday afternoon after the Baltimore medical facility ordered an evacuation of two buildings after possible tuberculosis exposure. "Public safety officials as well as infectious disease experts have now cleared the buildings, and the evacuation has been lifted", said John Hopkins in a statement to Gizmodo.

Fire crews are on the scene at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore after reports that people may have been exposed to tuberculosis when vials there were broken.

The amount released was equivalent to only a few drops, and no one was hurt, according to King.

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Both cancer research buildings were evacuated, according to the statement, and there was no indication that others were exposed.

There were employees in the area when the incident occurred, but hospital officials told the Baltimore Sun that no one required treatment.

Baltimore fire officials were not immediately available for comment.

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Tuberculosis bacteria are spread through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes or spits, and someone else can breathe in the bacteria and become sick. It can be fatal if it goes untreated.

In 2016, 10.4 million people around the world developed TB illness, and there were 1.7 million deaths, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TB can be treated through a months-long course of antibiotics, but its hardiness and poor antibiotic management on the part of doctors and patients had enabled incredibly resistant strains to start cropping up.

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Luckily, it seems, that's a scenario we won't have to worry about here.

Johns Hopkins evacuated after staff accidentally drops deadly tuberculosis sample