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Trial delayed in Giants, Eli Manning fraud case

16 May 2018

A settlement has been reached in the memorabilia fraud case against Giants quarterback Eli Manning, according to a report from Pro Football Talk.

A settlement has been reached in a lawsuit that claimed New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning provided bogus "game-worn" equipment that was sold to unsuspecting collectors.

In the case, collectors say they paid thousands of dollars for helmets that were altered to appear as if they were worn in National Football League games - including one supposedly worn by Manning in the 2008 Super Bowl.

When they left the courthouse before noon, there was little optimism from all parties involved that a settlement would soon be reached. "The compromise agreement, entered into by all parties, should not be viewed as supporting any allegations, claims or defenses".

"All parties are grateful to have the matter, which began in 2014, concluded and are now focused on football, the fans and the future", the statement added.

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Still, the veteran quarterback has denied wrongdoing in this case while claiming Inselberg had trafficked in fake memorabilia.

"The FBI never learned how several Giants employees, including the franchise quarterback, repeatedly engaged in the distribution of fraudulent Giants memorabilia", Inselberg's complaint alleged.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs, the Giants and Manning didn't return messages seeking comment Sunday night.

During the first hearing in the case, Brook highlighted the acrimony between parties, telling the judge that "counsel is not talking to each other". Brook said he had never experienced anything like it. "Lawyers should be talking to each other". If a settlement was not arranged, Manning could have been forced to serve as a witness on the stand. "I'm sorry, but we're not saying anything", he said.

According to the lawsuit, Manning had texted a team equipment manager that the helmets in question could "pass as game used".

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Inselberg says the helmets weren't game-used, and that emails show Manning engaged in a pattern of deceiving collectors.

The trial was set to start last September in state Superior Court in Bergen County, New Jersey after court documents containing emails indicated Manning's involvement in the scheme.

Skiba's reply says, "BS ones, you are correct".

The plaintiffs said they were duped by Manning into paying for "game-used" items that weren't actually used in games.

The typically low-key Manning has angrily denounced the allegations last spring, telling reporters: "I'm more angry than anything".

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Trial delayed in Giants, Eli Manning fraud case