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Will DACA be put on hold to avoid government shutdown?

18 January 2018

In a new note to clients on Wednesday, Height Securities said there's a 45-percent chance the government will shut down as a result of Congress failing to pass a spending bill by the deadline midnight Friday.

Negotiations between a bipartisan Senate group and the White House broke down last week in an acrimonious meeting at which Trump reportedly expressed his preference for immigrants from Norway over those who hail from Haiti and African nations.

Republican Senator Lindsay Graham on Tuesday blamed White House staff for altering Trump's positive view on the Senate bipartisan agreement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program that protects the Dreamers.

Ryan also said he wants to reach a compromise on immigration but won't bring such a measure to the House floor unless President Donald Trump supports it. "And he's not yet indicated what measure he's willing to sign", McConnell said at a Capitol Hill news conference. Democrats seeking leverage are forcing that bill to require 60 votes for passage. Saving the Dreamers from deportation is an issue popular with Democratic voters - and some House Democrats have said they will only vote for the stopgap bill if it offers security for the Dreamers.

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"It's the opposite of what I campaigned for", Trump said.

One of the most weird aspects of this whole fight over DACA and shitholes and Trump's racism is that Trump seems to think that if the failure to reach an immigration deal results in a government shutdown, he can credibly blame the Democrats for it and the people will go along with that. But it could be hard - and politically perilous - them to vote against funding health care for almost 9 million children.

This puts Democrats in a precarious situation: either they can vote in favor of the bill and jeopardize the safety of the young immigrants living in the US known as Dreamers, or vote against the bill and potentially trigger a government shutdown. The bill doesn't deal with DACA, and its anti-Obamacare provisions seem likely to both unify rank-and-file Republicans behind it, while further tempting Democrats to vote "no".

Talks among a bipartisan group of leaders of both the House and Senate convened Wednesday, but participants reported little progress. Funding for CHIP, which provides subsidized health insurance for children of low-income families, lapsed in September, but Congress approved another injection of money to keep CHIP going at the end of the year. "And if one happens, I think you have only one place to look, and that's to the Democrats", Sanders said during the daily briefing.

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"Let's make a budget deal by Friday and let's come back to work aggressively on Monday and make a deal on Daca and responsible immigration reform", Sanders said. Number two, we Democrats believe that we wanna do everything we can to avoid a shutdown.

Democratic Sen. Dick Durban has not wavered from his allegations of Trump's profanity during last week's meeting in the Oval Office. President Donald Trump ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program previous year, telling lawmakers to find a solution. Practically as soon as the deal was bruited about, House Freedom Caucus chairman Mark Meadows was making it known that he and many of his compadres were not onboard with Ryan, and might have enough votes to block the stopgap bill (in conjunction with Democrats who weren't part of Ryan's plan at all).

Mata said Schumer has "completely failed" the DACA recipients and that they have not "really heard from him" in the past couple of weeks.

House Freedom Caucus member Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.) told Independent Journal Review he expects a deal will be made, and he would "certainly" vote for a clean continuing resolution as long as House leadership agrees "to give us a vote" on a conservative immigration bill "at some point".

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The question is: Do you want President Trump to ignore the rule of law, act like a dictator, as Obama did, or should Congress pass corrective legislation which he will sign to solve the issue of DACA permanently?

Will DACA be put on hold to avoid government shutdown?