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'FEMA cannot stay in Puerto Rico forever!'

12 October 2017

Trump was apparently referring to a "simple back-of-the-envelope calculation" from CEA chairman Kevin Hassett, who estimated in a speech last month that if US firms didn't park their profits overseas, the jump in USA corporate profits would be passed on to workers, and over eight years, "the median USA household would get a $4,000 real income raise".

The Osceola County Regional Medical Center is discussing what else the facility can do to help the situation in Puerto Rico, including sending doctors to help the post-Hurricane Maria efforts.

The US President, quoting author Sharyl Attkisson, accused Puerto Ricans of creating a looming financial crisis "largely of their own making".

In the midst of all of this, one would expect the President of the United States to be doing all that he can to make sure that these American citizens are taken care of and sheltered while the rebuilding process begins.

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"A total lack of...accountability say the Governor. Electric and all infrastructure was disaster before hurricanes", Trump said.

"In a trio of tweets, Trump wrote" "We can not keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been wonderful (under the most hard circumstances) in P.R. forever!" "Congress to decide how much to spend", he wrote.

You may recall back in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina killed approximately 3,000 people in and around New Orleans.

Trump has responded defensively to criticism about his administration's response to the island after Hurricane Maria hit last month.

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Ryan plans to meet with local officials and emergency personnel.

Sens. BILL NELSON (D-FL) and MARCO RUBIO (R-FL) and Rep. DARREN SOTO (D-FL) have also been instrumental in coordinating the effort, as has FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS Pres./CEO PAT ROBERTS, who secured transportation for the radios from MIAMI to PUERTO RICO.

Puerto Rico is around $73 billion in debt, mainly to hedge funds and mutual funds, but with some federal loans.

The island is struggling with a long-term debt crisis that led it to declare a form of bankruptcy earlier this year.

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'FEMA cannot stay in Puerto Rico forever!'