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Senate delays vote on health care bill

28 June 2017

Three Republican senators announced their opposition to the current draft of the Senate health care bill Tuesday afternoon, shortly after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell chose to delay a vote on the plan until after the July 4 recess.

Earlier on Tuesday, four Republican senators said they would not support an initial vote on the bill, while five have said they couldn't support the bill without change on a final vote.

The Senate Republican health care bill would leave 22 million more Americans uninsured in 2026 than under President Barack Obama's health care law, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Monday, complicating GOP leaders' hopes of pushing the plan through the chamber this week.

Republican leadership can only afford two "no" votes from their party in the Senate, assuming all Democrats vote against the health care legislation. Sen.

Since the day Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveiled details of the bill last week, both Collins and fellow Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski seemed likely to fight against it.

Meanwhile, President Donald Trump invited all GOP senators to the White House for a meeting Tuesday afternoon.

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"We're going to press on", McConnell said. Rural America was a stronghold for Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

Paul has said it is worse to "pass a bad bill than to pass no bill".

That is the number of Republican senators who must back the bill for it to survive, with all Democrats opposed.

Ryan told reporters on Tuesday: "I would not bet against Mitch McConnell".

After meeting with Trump, McConnell warned that "the status quo is simply unsustainable" and said Republicans have two options. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), and Sen. While Trump did pick off an electoral vote in that state's Second Congressional District past year, Democrat Hillary Clinton won the state overall.

The analysis stated 22 million more people would be uninsured by the year 2026 if the BCRA became law, while the cost of premiums would increase in the next few years, before falling afterwards.

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"My problem with the Senate bill as it now exists is that we don't fix that", Paul said".

The overlapping concerns and competing interests of the lawmakers highlight the balancing act facing Mr McConnell as he tries to unify his party and deliver a legislative win to the president.

"This bill is every bit as mean as the House bill", said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

According to Politico, Republicans plan to take another swing at this shitty-ass draft "over the July 4th recess and get a new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office".

The Senate plan would end the tax penalty the law imposes on people who don't buy insurance, in effect erasing Obama's so-called individual mandate, and on larger businesses that don't offer coverage to workers.

McConnell praised Trump's involvement in the process over the last week, saying the president has been "fully engaged".

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Senate delays vote on health care bill