Saturday, 22 July 2017
Latest news
Main » Tories lead over Labour reaches 24 points in latest poll

Tories lead over Labour reaches 24 points in latest poll

21 April 2017

Peers would also be forced to back the priorities under the Salisbury Convention, which means that the Lords will not try and vote down government plans mentioned in an election manifesto.

Britain's Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks at a meeting about social care in Birmingham central England Tuesday April 18, 2017.

The latest poll comes after ComRes and ICM gave the Conservatives a 21 point lead, suggesting Theresa May could win a triple-digit majority at the general election on 8 June.

She said the Conservatives would provide "strong and stable leadership" for Brexit and beyond, and promising to wage "a positive and optimistic campaign".

At Prime Minister's Questions yesterday, Mrs May signalled a brutal election campaign that will target the Labour leader, telling MPs he was "simply not fit to lead" and claiming a Labour victory "would bankrupt our economy and weaken our defences".
However, she faced accusations that she was dodging scrutiny after confirming that she would not take part in any televised election debates.

Corbyn has refused to say whether he would resign as Labour leader if he loses the election.

More news: GNC Stock Soars 28% Despite Mixed Q1 Earnings

He said: "The Prime Minister and her cabinet have decided they want to have an election and within the constraints of the fixed parliament act, which I hope we will eventually get rid of, there has to be a vote in parliament".

Corbyn said years of Conservative austerity had led to falling living standards and called May "a prime minister who can't be trusted".

Although Parliament will not be officially dissolved until early May, campaigning is already under way - with Lib Dem leader Tim Farron addressing a rally of activists in south-west London earlier on Wednesday. The SNP accused Mrs May of political opportunism but abstained in Wednesday's vote.

And he told MPs: "We welcome the opportunity of a general election because it gives the British people the chance to vote for a Labour government that will put the interests of the majority first".

Earlier, Mr Corbyn dismissed Mrs May's argument that she needs a fresh mandate to deliver Brexit, and said it was "extremely interesting" that she had chosen to call an election as the Crown Prosecution Service prepares to decide whether to press charges against a string of Tory MPs over allegations relating to 2015 general election expenses.

May, who has described herself as "not a showy politician", said she would rather talk directly to voters.

More news: Which Analysts Are Watching Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:AGIO)?

"So we have this period in which the future of the United Kingdom in Europe, in the world, is in play and she wants to remove scrutiny and accountability and that lies beneath, I think, this snap decision just as much as the polls do". Former Conservative finance minister George Osborne, a powerful voice in favour of Britain's European Union membership during the referendum campaign, also said he would not seek re-election.

She said the early ballot would strengthen Britain's negotiating hand with the 27-member EU.

May formally notified the European Union on March 29 of Britain's intention to leave, and has said she is confident of reaching a deal on the terms of withdrawal in the two years available.

Theresa May said that Jeremy Corbyn was not fit to lead, but faced criticism over her refusal to take part in TV debates.

British Prime Minister Theresa May reacts during the debate.

More news: New Trump Order Extends 'Buy American' And 'Hire American' Rules